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En muchos países, las organizaciones no gubernamentales (ONG) y las organizaciones comunitarias tienen una importante y visible función en la campaña contra el trabajo infantil Leer más...

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Did you know that  around the world, agriculture is the sector where by far the largest share of child labourers is found – nearly 60 percent?

In fact, more than 129 million girls and boys aged 5 to 17 years old work in the agriculture sector, which includes crop and livestock production as well as foresty and fishing activities. Agriculture is one of the three most dangerous sectors in terms of work-related fatalities, non-fatal accidents and occupational diseases, and approximately 59 percent (or 70 million) of all children in hazardous work aged 5–17 are in agriculture.

It is important to note that not all activities that children participate in within this sector are considered as "child labour." Some participation in family farm activities can teach children valuable life skills, build pride and self-esteem, and contribute to family income and livlihoods. Children, should not, however, participate in hazardous activities that may harm their safety, health, morals or developmental well-being. 

To tackle the pressing issue of child labour in agriculture and support decent work initiatives for youth in this sector, the ILO developed a global, inter-agency advocacy team of labour and agriculture stakeholders. Since 2007, the International partnership for cooperation on child labour in agriculture (IPCCLA) has brought together the ILO, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), (formerly) the International Federation of Agricultural Producers (IFAP), and the International Union of Food, Agricultural, Hotel, Restaurant, Catering, Tobacco and Allied Workers’ Associations (IUF). 

IPCCLA supports collaboration between labour and agriculture stakeholders to better address child labour in agriculture. Knowledge exchange and policy collaboration between labour and agriculture organization are key to ground policy and legislation on child labour to the rural economy. Collaborating with ministries of labour, ministries of agriculture, departments of fisheries and forestry, agricultural extension services, farmers' organizations and cooperatives, agricultural producer organizations and agricultural research bodies, agricultural workers unions, bring together very different areas of technical expertise and understanding of child labour issues. A multidisciplinary perspective provides innovative solutions to promote child labour elimination and decent work for adults as part of sustainable agriculture.

Specifically, the IPCCLA aims to:

  • promote cooperation and programme and policy coherence on child labour among the Partners, especially at national level
  • mainstream child labour into existing activities of agricultural organizations and help raising awareness on how child labour elimination contributes to achieving organizational mandates of agricultural organizations;
  • promote action and cooperation to improve rural livelihoods and alternative income-generating activities, and to ensure that children do not carry out hazardous work in agriculture;
  • promote opportunities for decent youth employment in agriculture and in rural areas.

Are you interested in learning more about child labour, youth employment and decent work in various agriculture sub-sectors? If so, visit the FAO-ILO Working Together webpage - "Food, Agriculture and Decent Work" - which is continually updated with new information and IPCCLA activities:  http://www.fao-ilo.org/fao-ilo-child

 

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Hershey's, West African child labor, and the promise of Brazil's 'cabruca' system

Photo: Courtesy photo, License: N/A

     Slave-free chocolate from Posh Chocolat.

Valentine's Day is the chocolate industry's holiday season.  With an eye toward this February's annual love-fest, the International Labor Rights Forum purchased an advertising slot on a jumbotron outside the Super Bowl's Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis on which to broadcast a video calledHershey's Chocolate, Kissed by Child Labor.

Africa produces 70 percent of the world's cocoa — much of it with the region's infamously cheap labor. "In West Africa, where Hershey's sources much of its cocoa, over 200,000 children are forced to harvest cocoa beans every year," said Judy Gearhart, executive director of the International Labor Rights Forum, via a press release.

 

 

 

 

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Did you know that hazardous work is one of the worst forms of child labour? Sadly, more than half (53%, or 115 million) of the 215 million child labourers worldwide are caught in hazardous work. This is work that is detrimental to the health, safety and morals of developing children (ILO, 2011). 

The World Day Against Child Labour 2011 brought much needed attention to this urgent issue for good reason. Hazardous work is actually increasing for children between 15 and 17 years old. Within four years, this figure increased by 20% - jumping from 52 million to 62 million (ILO, 2010). Research from industrialized countries has shown that children have higher rates of injury and death at work than adults, thus emphasizing the particular vulnerabilities that children face when exposed to occupational hazards (ILO, 2011)..  

To complement the awareness raising activities of The World Day 2011, the ILO published a special report entitled: "Children in hazardous work: What we know, what we need to do." 

This report reviews the current knowledge base on the hazardous work of children and presents the case for a new focus on the issue as part of the wider global effort to eliminate the worst forms of child labour. The report highlights recent global trends while summarizing the scientific evidence related to the health of working children and adolescents. The report further identifies key challenges not only in understanding the effects of hazardous work on childhood development, but also in preventing hazardous occupational exposures for children. The report features good practice approaches of various stakeholder groups that have demonstrated the potential to be scaled up and discusses the importance of an integrated policy response to the issue. For this reason, this report is valuable for all individuals interested in protecting the developmental well-being of children: from workers and employers organizations, to community activists, NGOs, national governments, human rights groups, students, and countless others. 

 

To access this publication in English, Spanish and French, please visit: http://www.ilo.org/ipecinfo/product/viewProduct.do?productId=17035

 

 

Source:

ILO (2010). Global child labour developments: Measuring trends from 2004 to 2008 (Geneva, ILO). 

ILO (2011). Children in hazardous work: what we know, what we need to do (Geneva, ILO). 

 

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Fishing is one of the most hazardous occupational sectors, particularly for developing children and adolescents. Worldwide, it is estimated that 132 million girls and boys work in the agriculture sector, which includes children working in fisheries and aquaculture. 

This sector contains various hazardous activities. Activities can range from dock work, hauling and carrying heavy nets, maintaining vessels, cleaning and processing fish, line fishing, diving, selling fish, as well as many others. These tasks may involve long hours, extreme environmental exposures, hauling heavy loads, use of sharp tools, night work and psychosocial stressors. In addition, many children who work aboard large fishing vessels spent long periods of time away from their families and from school. Girls tend to be more often involved in post-harvest work, while boys mostly undertake work related to catching fish. Therefore, hazards may be quite different for girls and boys in this sector due to the gender division of labour. 

Most experts agree that child labour in fishing is a significant problem. However, information gaps exist in terms of the best practices in addressing this pressing issue. 

For this reason, the ILO and FAO have developed a draft document specifically aimed at addressing child labour in this sector, entitled: "FAO-ILO Good Practice Guide for Addressing Child Labour and Fisheries and Aquaculture: Policy and Practice." This document aims to help policy makers and government authorities tackle this growing danger for vulnerable children worldwide. The two organizations are currently seeking feedback on this document as a final version is scheduled to be published later this year. 

This document is currently available for public comment until April 30 2012. All feedback can be sent to Esta dirección electrónica esta protegida contra spambots. Es necesario activar Javascript para visualizarla . More information can be found at the FAO media center: http://www.fao.org/news/story/en/item/117475/icode/

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Catherine A. Fitzpatrick for Choihona Uzbekistan Uzbekistan News Brief

 
"Speaking Cotton," a film by Stefanie Trambow and Erik Malchow, portrays the ongoing exploitation of children in Uzbekistan’s cotton fields, with interviews of children as young as 11. The repeated scenes of large groups of children with their teachers, hunched over plucking cotton bolls for months, let us know this isn't about family farming, but a state-sanctioned program.
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Conflict and economic downturn cause global increase in reported child labour violations – 40% of countries now rated ‘extreme risk’ by Maplecroft

 
Brazil, China, India, Indonesia and Philippines expose companies to high levels of supply chain risk
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Die Presse - Die usbekische Regierung zwingt jeden Herbst 2,7 Millionen Kinder, bei der Ernte zu helfen.  Die Mitglieder des europäischen Parlaments votierten daher gegen eine Tarifreduktion auf Textilimporte.

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40 National  and International volunteers participated in  Filed photography on street and working children

Venue: Bangalore City India 

Date :8th January 2012

meeting Point :scead office Bangalore India

Project Director : Siju Thomas Daniel

 

Today was another out of the world, real experience. Excitement to go
on a field from the last few days turned out to be worth waiting for.
Around 40 SCEAD FOUNDATION volunteers, students from various colleges
and our international volunteers met up at the office in morning. We
were split into groups and were allotted different areas such as
Shivajinagar, K R market, Gandhi Bazar, and in and around areas of the
office. Our task for the day was to take photos of working children in
these busy hubs of Bangalore. Taking pictures only was not what we
were asked to do,  but in turn find out from these children, the
reasons for not attending schools and bring this to the notice of the
Anti Child labour Authorities . It was surely a very busy day the
teams as we got to walk in the gullies and find out many, many such
children. What we learnt today is that, not all children are lucky to
get education like us and sadly, also not being recognized by the
authorities in charge. our aim is to bring this to the notice of the
authorities about these sensitive children issues and make sure they
take this matter seriously.

Report by 

varsha olety

 

 

I am a student of Christ University pursuing Bachelors in Business Management. I’ve always had a soft corner for children. This is the best opportunity I could get to contribute to their development.
 

It was the first day for me as a part of SCEAD Foundation team and was asked to click several pictures of children working in the market areas and slums in Bangalore. We went to different places around Wilson Garden, Someshwaranagar, etc.  We went to the slum area because it was difficult to find working children in the city.

We saw so many children, some sitting with their parents in the verandah, some playing games in groups. It was quite touching that as soon as we arrived all of them gathered us and greeted us in their own special way (we couldn’t understand their language but could feel that they were happy to see us).  We took out our cameras to capture those beautiful moments. We played with them. More and more children came out being fascinated by the cameras and everyone was excited.

We went inside and to our surprise we saw three to four children playing in the garbage. It was a big area between two buildings which were under construction. When we went closer we saw that they were actually segregating the waste and not playing. That was quite shocking. I tried to ask them why they are doing it and was quite inquisitive to know about them more. But maybe it was our bad luck that we couldn’t have conversation because of inconvenience in understanding each other’s language.

 

We then left to search for more children as the parents started revolting because we were strangers and were trying to talk to their children and capturing their pictures. Most of the time when I travel I’m lost daydreaming about something or the other. But today it was quite different. I was conscious and aware about everyone whom I saw outside my window. Sadly, I was two children carrying big buckets of water in their heads. I went to them and asked them where they were taking it. They said they earn money for the work they do. They were small children of 10years each. They were paid Rs 500 per month for that work. I asked them about their family. They said that they live in a slum nearby. One of them said that his dad drives auto and his mom is dead. The other one said that his mother is a servant and his dad doesn’t do any work. I felt really sad listening to them. I couldn’t talk much and moved on.

 

These little incidents struck my heart and I feel disappointed thinking about their condition. I feel really lucky to have everything I ever wanted. My parents gave me whatever I asked for. I got the opportunity to experience luxuries in life, from AC rooms, TVs, Computers to the latest Cell phones. Wore clothes of the best brands and ate all the delicious dishes in 5 star hotels. I wonder how my life would be without all these. It’s actually very difficult to survive in such conditions where it’s difficult to even get a meal for a day (forget about luxuries).

I’ve always heard about the condition of poor people but never came across them so closely. I would like to thank SCEAD Foundation for helping me understand it and I would definitely love to work for these young children. Children, in spite of going to schools are doing these petty odd jobs just to earn their daily bread. I would appreciate the work being done by this organization to improve these children’s lifestyles and help to educate them and lead a healthy life ahead.

 

Bhavya Malhotra

BBM  (1st year)

Christ University , Bangalore

 

Total picture captured   around 500 , by 40 Volunteers

More pictures and feed back by the volunteers will be updated with by next 2 days

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